NIGHT IN THE COUNTRY: By Cynthia Rylant


Author: Cynthia Rylant is an American author, she has written more than 100 children’s books, many of Rylant’s books are about her childhood in Appalachia.

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Book: NIGHT IN THE COUNTRY

Genre: Children’s literature

Story by Cynthia Rylant

Pictures by Mary Szilagyi

Aladdin Paperbacks

An imprint of Simon & Schuster

First Aladdin Paperbacks edition 1991

 

Book Review: Night in the Country, is a story on describing the countryside at night with emphasis on the sound of some common night creatures, animals and things in the tranquil of night; the pictures give the impression of being colour pencil art – comprising of many darker tones of colours and are of blurry styles, it is like a visual narrative with few lines of the short story printed on the pages of the book.

 

Academic Use: This narrative is especially appropriate for teaching auditory readiness/discrimination in the age group of 4 to 6 years; the teacher can narrate the story along with the aid of an audio player for sound recordings of some of the creatures and things mentioned in the story.

As per my perspective, this story is best suited in audio visual format than in a book format for teaching auditory discrimination in preschool children.

This book is a good reading material for children of 6 to 8 years – with mentions of auditory words for vocabulary development, for encouraging nature sensitivity; and also a good resource book of art-works for children who are inclined towards creative-work of painting


Amazon link: Night in the Country by Cynthia Rylant


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No Talking – By Andrew Clements

Book Review

Author: Andrew Clements has written more than fifty books for children, including the award-winning, multimillion-copy bestseller Frindle.

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Book – No Talking

Genre – Children’s Literature

Author – Andrew Clements

Atheneum Books for Young Readers

An imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division

First paperback edition June 2009

Book Review: Dave Packer had to prepare a report on the history of India to give a presentation for five minutes or less for his social studies class, just some basic facts on anything related to India, he found the most interesting section on India was about how it became independent and thought the most interesting person in the story of India’s independence was Mahatma Gandhi – in one of the books, he read this about Gandhi:

For many years, one day each week Gandhi did not speak at all. Gandhi believed this was a way to bring order to his mind.

Dave wondered what that meant, “to bring order to his mind”, could something as simple as not talking change the way your mind worked? … this belief seemed to have been good for Gandhi; would not talking make him smarter?  So Dave decided to give this philosophy a try, to effort to keep his mouth shut all day on Monday, but giving this report in his social studies class on Monday would ruin his experiment … How would he cope with his experiment of “No Talking” for a day? How could this philosophy help Dave of fifth grade?

The story develops to discover the influence of Dave’s experiment – first as a personal goal of Dave which later transpires as a contest for two days between the students of the fifth grade as Boys vs. Girls, with a set of rules to follow; how the teachers deal with the peculiar situation on the first day of the contest, how the teachers involve themselves in this contest on the second day to appreciate the concept’s novel approach in the teaching and learning process.

 

As per my grasp of the story, the source of this story is founded on research discoveries of the concept – “No Talking”, executed in a school; the scheme of the narrative is purposely kept entertaining so as to captivate the curious mind of a child – which expresses about the author’s commendable story telling ability with a challenging storyline to narrate specifically to children. The concept and the clever narration  of the story is more appropriate  for children of 10 years and above to comprehend and appreciate, and at a leisurely pace a child probably  will take less than a week’s time to finish reading this book. The theme of the story is essentially based in a school background thus incudes a lot of names of students and teachers which could bring a trace of confusion in a young mind while reading.

 

 “No Talking” as an activity in school is a practical concept with many constructive benefits towards a child’s holistic development, as revealed in the book – this activity can be carried out in schools for 1 day, for at least 2 times in an academic year, for children above 10 years; for teachers this book caters as an useful resource book for planning this activity.


Amazon link: No Talking by Andrew Clements


How to Be Cool in the Third Grade: By BETSY DUFFEY

Book Review

Amazon link: How to Be Cool in the Third Grade – By BETSY DUFFEY

“Babies can’t talk like you and me,” she continued. “They can’t say ‘I’m hungry,’ or ‘I’m wet’, or ‘I’m tired.’ But they sure can let you know when they want something.”

How simple it seemed, Robbie thought, looking down at Tobey:

Waaa! And you got whatever you want. He wished it was that simple when you grew up.

Waaa! New jeans would appear.

Waaa! People would stop calling you names.

Waaa! Your mother would stop kissing you at the bus stop. (p. 47)

 — An excerpt from the book, ‘How to Be Cool in the Third Grade’- By BETSY DUFFEY

 

How to Be Cool in the Third Grade: Published in 1993

A story about a timid boy named ‘Robert Hayes York’; who dislikes his baby name Robbie, hates his school clothes which his parents chooses for him to wear—tan and stiff shorts, white socks and shirt with collars, despises his mom’s kisses at the bus stop—to cause a spot of the bright red lipstick on his cheek —  at the start of the academic year into the third grade Robbie writes down  a set of necessary rules which, according to him, will help him become cool—and how a bully boy ‘Bo’ at school changes Robbie’s attitude for better, as well as Robbie’s niceness changes Bo’s rudeness towards him …

The title of the book admiringly suggest that this book is specifically meant for third graders i.e. children of 7 to 8 years; however this nice, humorous, short, fiction story is a suitable read for children between the age-group of 8 to 10 years too; at a leisurely pace a child may take a week’s time to finish reading this book.

Author: Betsy Duffey is the author of numerous books for young readers; her books have been Junior Library Guild selections, Crown Award nominees, and have been Parent’s Choice and Children’s Choice selections. Her books have been translated into Japanese, Korean, Dutch and Danish, and included in numerous book clubs.

Illustrated by Janet Wilson


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GREAT STORIES FOR CHILDREN – By Ruskin Bond

The stories in this book are mostly based on the wonderful sync which humans have with nature for survival …

Ruskin Bond has been writing for over sixty years, and has now over 120 titles in print – novels, collection of short stories, poetry, essays, anthologies and books for children. His first novel, THE Room on the Roof, received the prestigious John Llewellyn Rhys Award in 1957. He has also received the Padma Shri in 1999 and the Padma Bhushan in 2014.

There are 18 short stories in this book, the last section being a short autobiography of the author.

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Here, I have mentioned the title of 8 stories with excerpts from each story to give you a glimpse of the author’s elegant and easy craft of writing, the stories in this book are mostly based on the wonderful sync which humans have with nature for survival. This book is a delightful read for adults and an exciting read for children between the age-group of 8 to 12 years.

A SPECIAL TREE

     In the cherry tree, bees came to feed on the nectar in the blossoms, and tiny birds pecked at the blossoms and broke them off. But the tree kept blossoming right through the spring and three were always more blossoms than birds. (pg. 7)

 

THE SCHOOL AMONG THE PINES

Fortunately, Bina’s village was not in the pine belt; the fires did not reach it. But Nauti was surrounded by a fire that raged for three days, and the children had to stay away from school.

            And then, towards the end of June, the monsoon rains arrived and there was an end to forest fires. (pg. 33)

 

THE WIND ON HAUNTED HILL

Whoo, whoo,whoo, cried the wind as it swept down from the Himalayan snows …

… There was nearly always a strong wind in these parts. Three children were spreading clothes out to dry on a low stone wall, putting a stone on each piece.

            Eleven-year-old Usha, dark- haired and rose-cheeked, struggled with her grandfather’s long, loose shirt. Her younger brother, Suresh, was doing his best to hold down a bedsheet, while Usha’s friend, Binya, a slightly older girl, helped.  (pg. 41- 42)

 

TIGER MY FRIEND

     For an hour the villagers beat the jungle, shouting, drumming, and trampling the undergrowth.

     The tiger had no rest. Whenever he was able to put some distance between himself and the men, he would sink down in some shady spot to rest; but, within a few minutes, the trampling and drumming would come nearer, and with an angry snarl he would get up again and pad northwards, along the narrowing strip of jungle, towards the bridge across the river. (pg. 75)

 

MONKEY TROUBLE

     There was enough space for Tutu to look out of the bag occasionally, and to be fed with bananas and biscuits, but she could not get her hands through the opening and the canvas was too strong for her to bite her way through.

     Tutu’s efforts to get out only had the effect of making the bag roll about on the floor or occasionally jump into the air – an exhibition that attracted a curious crowd of onlookers at the Dehra and Meerut railway stations. (pg. 83- 84)

 

WHEN THE TREES WALKED

            ‘One day the trees will move again,’ said Grandfather. ‘They’ve been standing still for thousands of years but there was a time when they could walk about like people. Then along came an interfering busybody who cast a spell over them, rooting them to one place. But they’re always trying to move. See how they reach out their arms! And some of them, like the banyan tree with its travelling aerial roots, manage to get quite far.’ (pg. 132)

 

PRET IN THE HOUSE

     He began by hiding Grandmother’s spectacles whenever she took them off.

            ‘I’m sure I put them down on the dressing-table,’ she grumbled.

            A little later they were found balanced precariously on the snout of a wild boar, whose stuffed and mounted head adorned the veranda wall. Being the only boy in the house, I was at first blamed for this prank; but a day or two later, when the spectacles disappeared again only to be discovered dangling from the wires of the parrot’s cage, it was agreed that some other agency was at work. (pg. 143)

 

THE NIGHT THE ROOF BLEW OFF

     Our roof had held fast in many a storm, but the wind that night was really fierce. It came rushing at us with a high-pitched, eerie wail. The old  roof groaned and protested, it took a battering for several hours while the rain lashed against the windows and the lights kept coming and going. (pg.169)


I had purchased this book from Amazon; you too can grab a copy for yourself through this direct Amazon link –  GREAT STORIES FOR CHILDREN – By Ruskin Bond