The Italian’s Vengeful Seduction: By Bella Frances

Book Review

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The vigorous title of the novel impeccably matches with the content of the novel; the author has remarkably penned the romantic equation between the two central characters of the book, which the novel entirely involves of, as an intense romantic chemistry yet almost without the trace of vulgarity and with a shrewd sense of humour.

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Novel: The Italian’s Vengeful Seduction

Genre: Romance

Author: Bella Frances

Mills & Boon Modern Romance

First Published in Great Britain  2017

By Mills & Boon, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers

Book Review:  Stacey Jackson was Marco Borsatto adolescent fantasy, as a teenager every single thing about her caused some kind of chain reaction in him from brain to body, and he considered her special — in her explosive toxic anger she’d lied to say stupid things to him that had caused them both pain and had made her and his life spin.

 After ten years, Stacey by coincidence bangs with his limousine in a minor traffic accident, and then their passionate adult romantic equation begins …

It is one of those love stories which has a cliché plot; and on the other hand Bella Frances has powerfully proven how a writer’s optimistic attitude can greatly affect to turn a cliché plot into an awesome narrative. The author has not dwelled too much into trivial description of things, and has remained loyal to the main essence of the plot in her narrative i.e. the sensual chemistry between the protagonists; the conversation between the main characters of the story is likeable and so is the smooth narrative to easily fascinate the reader into the soft quality of the story, with no disturbing elements included to cause reader distress.

As a reader of this novel, I would like to say that the picture of the male model at the cover of the book does not match with the robust description of the male character Marco Borsatto  of the novel. All in all, this novel is an enjoyable read for readers of 16 years and above; and in the words of the author of the novel – the story can be termed as, “Original. A little more flavoursome.”


Amazon link: The Italian’s Vengeful Seduction (Claimed by a Billionaire): By Bella Frances


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Stolen by Lesley Pearse

Book Review

This novel gives the impression to be factual account of a real life incident or combination of several real life incidents, woven stylishly by an intoxicating story-telling from a chic writer—Lesley Pearse.

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Stolen:-

Author –  Lesley Pearse

Published in Penguin Books 2010

Book Review: A woman in her mid-twenties, with brutally cropped blonde hair and with purple marks on her wrists and ankles as if she’d been restrained, is found half drowned on the beach at Selsey. She is taken to a hospital in Chichester, she is weak, suffering from hypothermia and exhaustion, but her loss of memory is the most troubling aspect, her trauma the reason for the amnesia.

Dale Moore, a beautician in a spa at a Hotel near Brighton recognizes her to be her friend, Lotte Wainwright,  a hairdresser on the cruise ship they worked together fourteen months ago … the story leads to a sequence of ruthless realities.

The plot of the story is disturbing and may cause some readers distress; the horribleness of a parent is sourced as the primary factor of the protagonist’s misery, causing the young protagonist to get trapped into a tormenting situation. This story also breaks the myth of stereotypical friendship and also the myth of clichés relating to family bond.

The author’s effort in describing all the trivial things to present the reader with an enchanting experience, and with an in-depth analysis of the characters of the story along with the descriptive narration of the grief-stricken situation of the protagonist is in empathetic regard; however the reader may find the story draggy especially at the concluding chapters.

This novel, however lengthy a reader may find it to be, is worth a read from readers of 18 years and above; and shines forth with the supreme ability of the  writer in sequencing the events intelligently to rouse the reader with curiosity and also for narrating the gloomy plot of the story with sensible brighter shades of writing.


Amazon link: Stolen by Lesley Pearse


Readers of this blog are welcome to recommend any fiction novel (Genre: mystery, romance, science fiction/fantasy, suspense/thriller, realistic fiction, historical fiction, young adult, children’s literature) in English language for book review – I prefer to read novels in paperback format, share your thoughts through the comment section of this Blog: mirandavoice.com or tweet at twitter.com/mirandapresence

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New York, Actually – By SARAH MORGAN

Book Review

Author: Sarah Morgan is the no.1 bestselling author with sales of over 15 million, her other novels based on the Big Apple  are Sleepless in Manhattan, Sunset in Central Park & Miracle on 5th Avenue.

 ‘Morgan is a magician with words’ – RT Book Reviews  

New York, Actually (HarperCollinsPublishers): Book Review

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This novel is on Molly, Dr. Kathleen Molly Parker, a relationship psychologist — her bog, Ask a Girl, has a large volume of traffic; and her books had hit the bestseller lists in both the US and the UK all under her pseudonym Aggie – which meant she had both anonymity and financial security enabling her to live comfortably in New York City.

On her early morning run with her dog, a Dalmatian—Valentine who has a heart shaped nose, in Central Park she comes across Daniel Knight, with his dog, a German shepherd—Brutus who is as strong and athletic as his owner; but something about the way he moved told her that when this man wasn’t pounding the paths, he dressed in a suit and was commander in chief of whichever empire he presided over.

Mr. Daniel Knight is the best divorce lawyer in Manhattan, who gets smitten by Molly during his early morning run – it wasn’t just her hair that caught his attention or those incredible legs, it was the air of confidence …

This is an unusual contemporary love-story, Molly and Daniel are characters with contrasting professional interest and that’s the incompatible point between these two’s outlook towards relationship, at first; otherwise they both personally view romantic relationships as a short-term association and this assertiveness brings them both together, at first.

Through this story, the author also remarkably expresses about the consequence of conflict in a relationship. (pp. 222, 223 & 224)

The city of Manhattan is the backdrop of this love-story; it particularly describes the Central Park and a bit of the city’s landscape in a vibrant manner.

 

The plot of the story fascinates  the reader to finish reading the story as rapidly as possible as it leisurely discloses layers and layers of mysteries, and the prose which consistently comprises of witty conversations between the different characters of the story has the reader thrilled – which certainly articulates  about the charismatic writing skill of the author—Sarah Morgan.



Amazon link: New York, Actually by Sarah Morgan


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BETWEEN the SHEETS – By Molly O’Keefe

Book Review

This novel is like watching (or the better word is IMAGINING) an X-rated Hollywood movie with a superb storyline. The book cover does suggest an erotic allure and it does contain a fair amount of the same, which seems not as much of tender and with a trace of sexual violence between the story’s main characters Shelby and Ty, because through this literature the writer essentially tries to mention how supressed negative emotions sprung reflexively during the very intimate moments.

Furthermore, this story talks of — the illness of Alzheimer, the excess care and support needed by its affected; how brutal childhood has a negative imprint on adult personality.

 

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Shelby Monroe, an art teacher, is a part-time employee at Bishop Elementary school; who’d been in cold, slightly awkward affairs with men she wanted very little from, men there was never any fear would try to get more from her — meets Wyatt Svenson, his nickname Ty, a man with a tall and wide physique and a charming personality; through Casey – a eleven-year old, tall and gangly boy, Ty’s child from a former girlfriend …

There are many other characters in this story which gives the story a nice strength, by the end of this very beautifully story all the broken pieces of Shelby’s and Ty’s core personality is merged together because of their faith in each other and their willingness to try to chance the bad situation in order to move ahead in life.

 

The very lengthy erotic passages has some monotonous moments – otherwise from this, the narration captures the complexity of human emotions to the very core in a brilliant writing by Molly O’Keefe.

 

Few excerpts from this novel:

“Hey, Ms. Monroe,” Casey whispered, but before Shelby could say anything, Mom leaned over and shushed him.

Shelby gave him a wink and then tried very hard to pay attention to the church service.

………

“Tic-tac-toe?” he whispered. “Am I six?”

A laugh bubbled out of her and now her own mom was giving her the death stare. She composed herself and drew a hangman and the spaces for a ten-letter word.

“Hangman,” he whispered. “I like it.”

She pointed to a blank spot where he could write down his guesses and handed him the stubby pencil. Over the top of Casey’s bright head, Wyatt was watching her, and despite her years of experience ignoring things, she could ignore him for only so long. Almost as if her eyes were magnetized and he was true north, she could not help but look at him.  (pp.118 -119)

 

“Mom, we need to talk.”

“About the factory? Because I know our numbers are down, but I‘ve made some changes to the—”

“It’s not about the factory.”

“I can’t lay anyone else off. We’re running on a skeleton crew.”

“Mom. We’re going to have to bring someone into our house. A nurse. To care for you.”

 Mom was silent, and the tall weeds growing through the cracks in the asphalt and between the stones of the drive were laid nearly flat by the wind. Sturdy weeds levelled. (pp. 256 -257)

 

“We’ll go slow,” he told her. “For both of us.”

“Slow? We haven’t done anything slow.”

“We’ll start with dinner. Sunday night, my house. I’ll cook.”

“You can cook?”

“See all the things we don’t know about each other?”

She smiled at his joke and he felt the engine of his heart kick over. This was happening. It was really happening.

“What about Casey?”

“My son and I have kept enough secrets from each other, Shelby. If you and I are a thing, he’s got to know about it. If we’re in, we’re all in.”

She let go of the box only to cup his face in her hands. She pressed her lips on his, softly. Sweetly. She tasted of coffee and toothpaste, and if faith had a flavour, it was there too. (pp. 298 – 299)

Author: Molly O’Keefe is also the author of several other novels – Wild Child, Crazy Thing Called Love, Can’t Buy Me Love, and Can’t Hurry Love.

Amazon link: Between the Sheets (The Boys of Bishop)

How to Be Cool in the Third Grade: By BETSY DUFFEY

Book Review

Amazon link: How to Be Cool in the Third Grade – By BETSY DUFFEY

“Babies can’t talk like you and me,” she continued. “They can’t say ‘I’m hungry,’ or ‘I’m wet’, or ‘I’m tired.’ But they sure can let you know when they want something.”

How simple it seemed, Robbie thought, looking down at Tobey:

Waaa! And you got whatever you want. He wished it was that simple when you grew up.

Waaa! New jeans would appear.

Waaa! People would stop calling you names.

Waaa! Your mother would stop kissing you at the bus stop. (p. 47)

 — An excerpt from the book, ‘How to Be Cool in the Third Grade’- By BETSY DUFFEY

 

How to Be Cool in the Third Grade: Published in 1993

A story about a timid boy named ‘Robert Hayes York’; who dislikes his baby name Robbie, hates his school clothes which his parents chooses for him to wear—tan and stiff shorts, white socks and shirt with collars, despises his mom’s kisses at the bus stop—to cause a spot of the bright red lipstick on his cheek —  at the start of the academic year into the third grade Robbie writes down  a set of necessary rules which, according to him, will help him become cool—and how a bully boy ‘Bo’ at school changes Robbie’s attitude for better, as well as Robbie’s niceness changes Bo’s rudeness towards him …

The title of the book admiringly suggest that this book is specifically meant for third graders i.e. children of 7 to 8 years; however this nice, humorous, short, fiction story is a suitable read for children between the age-group of 8 to 10 years too; at a leisurely pace a child may take a week’s time to finish reading this book.

Author: Betsy Duffey is the author of numerous books for young readers; her books have been Junior Library Guild selections, Crown Award nominees, and have been Parent’s Choice and Children’s Choice selections. Her books have been translated into Japanese, Korean, Dutch and Danish, and included in numerous book clubs.

Illustrated by Janet Wilson


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The Girl in the Mirror – By Cecelia Ahern

Book Review

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The Girl in the Mirror

Author: Cecelia Ahern

This short novel of less than 100 pages comprises two short stories with bizarre concept perfected by perfect human emotions.

The title of the novel is the title of the first story i.e. Girl in the Mirror, narrated with smidgen of fairy tale charm mixed with fair amount of quirkiness.

Lila’s grandmother – Ellie, whom Lila fondly calls as Grellie, happens to drape all the mirrors in her spacious, hoary house completely in black sheeting. This little girl  has no anxiety of her grandmother’s odd behaviour — however, twenty-eight years old Lila disobeys  her grandmother’s rule to  unwrap a free-standing, full-length mirror, located in a spare room which she is strictly warned not to enter; on her wedding day to  see herself  in her wedding dress—and a peculiar incident happens ….

 

The second story, The Memory Maker, is a highly intellectual piece which takes about 2 to 3 times of reading to appreciate the inimitable concept of the story.

Tucked away in the basement of a Georgian house is a futuristic devise, the memory-maker, a machine which helps people in creating new memories, the creator of the machine is neither a doctor nor a scientist; and a great sadness is the reality behind the invention of this machine …

It takes a maximum of 2 days to finish reading this novel, more so because of the thrilling story telling ability of the writer which keeps you hooked on till you finish reading the entire story. This novel is a suitable read for teenagers as well as adults.

 

Amazon link: The Girl in the Mirror

EMMA – By Jane Austen

Book Review

Jane Austen (1775 – 1817): Jane Austen is one of the most well-known and widely-read English novelists.

Jane’s fascination with words and with world of stories began quite early, in the 1780s during her adolescence she started writing her own novels. Between 1811 to 1816, Jane started to anonymously publish her works; Emma was published during this time.

Her works started attracting scholarly attention in the 1920s and came to be recognized as brilliant masterpieces and revealing commentaries on social conditions of Austen’s time.

Emma: This novel is a very lengthy read, with 55 chapters, very intellectually phrased with complex grammatical construction of sentences, which has to be read in short passages for a proper understanding rather than choosing for a hasty read which may cease to lose the novel’s excellence in the reader’s opinion.

It is unadulterated literature that enriches the reader with exceptional knowledge of English literature and in quintessence articulates about the opulent cultural life of people belonging to the upper stratum of society in England during the end of 18th century and at the beginning of 19th century. The humour is polished sarcastic; the novel starts with theatrical appeal with very lengthy conversations and gradually eases to poised narrative.

Highly recommended read for avid literature readers, and once you have finished reading this novel—it will all the more intrigue you for another read.

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EMMA- By Jane Austen

Twenty-one years old Emma Woodhouse is handsome, clever, and rich; the daughter of Mr. Woodhouse — a nervous old man, beloved for the friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper. The real evils of Emma’s situation is the disposition to think a little too well of herself, which leads her through a course of outright misperception in her impulsive ideas of match-making.

Hartfield, is Emma Woodhouse’s paradise; the residence of Mr. Woodhouse—the Woodhouses first in consequence in a town of Highbury.

There are many characters that exist to make this story about Highbury and Hartfield complete, a few important ones are:

Harriet Smith – A seventeen-year old, a parlour-boarder at Mrs. Goddard’s school, is a girl not certainly clever but with a sweet, docile, grateful disposition; totally free from conceit and only desiring to be guided by any one she looked up to.

Mr. Elton – A very respectable vicar of Highbury, is a handsome young man.

Mr. (Gerorge)Knightley – A sensible man with a cheerful manner, a very old and intimate friend of the family, but particularly connected with it as the elder brother of Isabella’s (Emma’s elder sister) husband. He lived about a mile away in the adjoining parish of Highbury, at Donwell Abbey.

Mr. Weston – A native of Highbury, had satisfied an active, cheerful mind and social temper by entering into militia of his country. Once his wife death, after a three years’ marriage, the widower-father, gave his child up to the care and wealth of the Churchill’s. When a complete change of life became desirable, he quitted the militia and engaged in trade. After eighteen or twenty years of his life, he had purchased a little estate adjoining Highbury, at Randalls; and obtained his second wife– a truly amiable woman, Miss Taylor.

Miss Taylor/ Mrs. Weston: Sixteen years had Miss Taylor been in Mr. Woodhouse’s  family, less as a governess than a friend, particularly very fond of Emma, between them it was more the intimacy of sisters. Matrimony as the origin of change, Miss Taylor was happily married to Mr. Weston.

Mr. Frank Churchill: Brought up as his uncle’s heir; Mr. Frank Churchill — a very good looking young man, had a great deal of the spirit and liveliness of his father’s.

Miss Jane Fairfax: The only child of Mrs. Bates’s youngest daughter; Mrs. Bates’s – the widow of a former vicar of Highbury, was a very old lady. Jane was an orphan, brought up by Colonel Campbell. Living constantly with right-minded and well-informed people, her heart and understanding had received every advantage of discipline and culture; and Colonel Campbell’s residence being in London, every lighter talent had been done full justice to, by the attendance of first-rate masters.   

Miss Bates: The simplicity and cheerfulness of her nature, her contented and grateful spirit, were a recommendation to every body, and a mine of felicity to herself. She was a great talker upon little matters, full of trivial communications and harmless gossip.

The catalysts of this novel are the characters – Miss Jane Fairfax and Mr. Frank Churchill.

Pages 163, 189, 190 & 191 – Comprises very brilliant descriptive narrative of a shop called ‘Ford’, which is place of convenience to the citizens of Highbury.

Chapter 8: This chapter is a debate over the mind-set related to men and women on the subject of suitability of partner associated with social norms in the prospect of matrimony, these considerations do prevail in the present era in consequence to arranged marriages in some cultures.

A few passages from this novel:

“ A man,” sad he, “must have a very good opinion of himself when he asks people to leave their own fireside, and encounter such a day as this, for the sake of coming to see him. He must think himself a most agreeable fellow; I could not do such a thing. It is the greatest absurdity —Actually snowing at this moment!—The folly of not allowing people to be comfortable at home—and the folly of people’s not staying comfortably at home when they can! If we were obliged to go out such an evening as this, by any call of duty or business, what a hardship we should deem it;—and here are we, probably with rather thinner clothing than usual, setting forward  voluntarily, without excuse, in defiance of the voice of nature, which tells man, in every thing given to his view or his feeling, to stay at home himself, and keep all under shelter that he can;—here are we setting forward to spend five dull hours in another man’s house, with nothing to say or to hear that was not said and heard yesterday, and may not be said and heard again to-morrow. Going in dismal weather, to return probably in worse;—four horses and four servants taken out for nothing but to convey five idle, shivering creatures into colder rooms and worse company than they might have had at home.” (p. 95)

 

“But your father is not going so far; he is only going to the Crown, quite on the other side of the street, and there are a great many houses; you might be very much at a loss, and it is very dirty walk, unless you keep on the footpath; but my coachman can tell you where you had best cross the street.”

 Mr. Frank Churchill still declined it, looking as serious as he could and his father gave his hearty support by calling out, “My good friend, this is quite unnecessary; Frank knows a puddle of water when he sees it, and as to Mrs. Bates’s, he may get there from the Crown in a hop, step, and jump.”(p. 159)

 

“If it would be good to her, I am sure it would be evil to himself; a very shameful and degrading connexion. How would he bear to have Miss Bates belonging to him?—To have her haunting the Abbey, and thanking him all day long for his great kindness in marrying Jane?—

“So  very kind and obliging!—But he always had been such a very kind neighbour!”And then fly off, through half a sentence, to her mother’s old petticoat. “Not that it was such a very old petticoat either—for still it would last a great while—and, indeed, she must thankfully say that their petticoats were all very strong.”(p. 183)

 

When the ladies returned to the drawing-room after dinner, Emma found it hardly possible to prevent their making two distinct parties;—with so much perseverance in judging and behaving ill did Mrs. Elton engross Jane Fairfax and slight herself. She and Mrs. Weston were obliged to be almost always either talking together or silent together. Mrs. Elton left them no choice. If Jane repressed her for a little time, she soon began again; and though much that passed between them was in a half-whisper, especially on Mrs. Elton’s side, there was no avoiding a knowledge of their principal subjects: The post-office—catching cold—fetching letters—and friendship, were long under discussion … (p. 243)

 

“I cannot make speeches, Emma:” he soon resumed; and in a tone of such sincere, decided, intelligible tenderness as was tolerably convincing.—“If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more. But you know what I am.—You hear nothing but truth from me.—I have blamed you, and lectured you, and you have borne it as no other woman in England would have borne it. —Bear with the truths I would tell you now, dearest Emma, as well as you have borne with them. The manner, perhaps, may have as little to recommend them. God knows, I have been a very indifferent lover.— But you understand me …. (p. 348)


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